THIS WEEK’S NEWS

Stories I’d Like to See

by Nancy Kay Clark
CL editor & publisher

Like my story I can’t seem to finish writing, this winter of our discontent drags on and on. With every new case of coronavirus reported in the press and social media full of divisive politicos, abusive trolls and bots manipulating public opinion is it any wonder that every third person I know is depressed or anxious?

And how do I as a writer respond to a world that one could argue is brimming with too much shouting and not enough quiet reflection?

Recently, I’ve been getting a slew of submissions satirizing Trumpian politics and supporters. I understand the anger and desire to bear witness to the absurdities of the current White House, but I’m reluctant to post these submissions on CL — nor would I post stories satirizing people who are anti-Trump. It’s not because I’m nicey-nice Canadian and above dirty politics (as my fellow citizens know Canadian politics this winter has also been full of strife), but because I don’t want to add to the shouting.

Instead, I want to post (and write) stories that offer visions of the world going forward — not post-apocalyptic epics, but stories of building a post-fossil fuel society, of people struggling to bridge the political divide and find common ground, of people both celebrating our differences and our shared humanity, maybe even of a post-Canada Canada where settlers honour their treaties with indigenous peoples and respect their autonomy. What would that look like? What would happen to everyone currently employed in the oil and gas industry? How would such societies function? Of course, there would still be passionate arguments, pissing matches and bigotry — that’s all in the human DNA, and besides you wouldn’t have much of a story without conflict — but the focus would be on hope and a vision of the future that’s a little more sunnier than what we have now.

If you have a story of imperfect people moving forward with love and hope, please submit them here.Like my story I can’t seem to finish writing, this winter of our discontent drags on and on. With every new case of coronavirus reported in the press and social media full of divisive politicos, abusive trolls and bots manipulating public opinion is it any wonder that every third person I know is depressed or anxious?

And how do I as a writer respond to a world that one could argue is brimming with too much shouting and not enough quiet reflection?

Recently, I’ve been getting a slew of submissions satirizing Trumpian politics and supporters. I understand the anger and desire to bear witness to the absurdities of the current White House, but I’m reluctant to post these submissions on CL — nor would I post stories satirizing people who are anti-Trump. It’s not because I’m nicey-nice Canadian and above dirty politics (as my fellow citizens know Canadian politics this winter has also been full of strife), but because I don’t want to add to the shouting.

Instead, I want to post (and write) stories that offer visions of the world going forward — not post-apocalyptic epics, but stories of building a post-fossil fuel society, of people struggling to bridge the political divide and find common ground, of people both celebrating our differences and our shared humanity, maybe even of a post-Canada Canada where settlers honour their treaties with indigenous peoples and respect their autonomy. What would that look like? What would happen to everyone currently employed in the oil and gas industry? How would such societies function? Of course, there would still be passionate arguments, pissing matches and bigotry — that’s all in the human DNA, and besides you wouldn’t have much of a story without conflict — but the focus would be on hope and a vision of the future that’s a little sunnier than what we have now.

If you have a story of imperfect people moving forward with love and hope, please submit them here.

Email the editor with your ideas and comments.

The CommuterLit origin story
CommuterLit was profiled by The Parkdale Villager newspaper with the story behind the website and the launch of the CommuterLit print anthology, Selections. Read the article here.

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